Entries by admin

Cervical spondylomyelopathy

Cervical spondylomyelopathy causes a chronic, progressive gait disturbance, which can range from mild to severe tetraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia.

Thiamine deficiency

Dogs and cats are unable to endogenously synthesize thiamine so it must be obtained from the diet. Thiamine deficiency can occur via several mechanisms.

Periodontal disease

The extent of periodontal disease encountered in veterinary patients can vary from patient to patient and even from tooth to tooth in the same patient.

Neurologic exam & localization

Performing a good neurologic examination with proper neurolocalization is critical for devising a suitable list of differential diagnoses with subsequent treatment plans with patients presenting with neurological diseases.

Myths in clinical cardiology

Much of our education has been taught as dogma. This post reviews a list of common clinical myths involving cardiac disease with little evidence to support their validity.

Tooth resorption in dogs and cats

Tooth resorption is the progressive destruction of the calcified substance of permanent teeth by clastic cells. It can be extremely painful and is one of the most common oral diseases seen in cats. It is also frequently found in dogs.

Water, water everywhere: Fluid choices in the hospitalized patient

Fluid therapy is a crucial part of the treatment of patients in the emergency room and the critical care unit. Though it has great ability to help our patients, like any medical intervention, it has the potential to do harm as well. Having a greater understanding of the fluid balance within the body, the effect of different disease states on this fluid balance, and the fluid choices available for treating our patients is vital to maximizing patient benefit, while minimizing side effects of therapy.

Canine cognitive dysfunction

With advances in veterinary medicine, we are more and more commonly seeing our pets living to a greater age than has been reported historically. Current estimates in the companion animal population indicate that there are more than 50 million senior and geriatric dogs over the age of 7 years. As such, advanced age in our pets and their associated illnesses have become a very important aspect in who and what we treat in our roles as general practitioners and specialists, alike.